This site has been created to expand and share on some of the insights that led to the writing of It's Monday Only in Your Mind: You Are Not Your Thoughts.

Because everything is impermanent, the satisfaction associated with whatever is reached for is also impermanent and this is the exact reason why one is constantly reaching and remains unsatisfied.

Not being satisfied is so subtle, and how you will know it’s in place is by the next thing reached for. The misunderstanding of the impermanent nature of all things including life itself is what makes one constantly reach for satisfaction. If one knew the reaching wasn’t going to quench the satisfaction, it most likely wouldn’t be done. One reaches for whatever their conditioning deems as needed, and even though it temporarily satisfies the thirst, it doesn’t last and hence the reaching commences. When the impermanent nature of all things begins to be understood, one becomes aware of the nonsense of reaching. This doesn’t mean the reaching will magically end, but one does start to understand the true nature associated with reaching. If there wasn’t the satisfaction associated with food, dessert, drugs, alcohol, gambling, yoga, meditation, ad infinitum, reaching wouldn’t be done. Everyone who reaches for something assumes there’s going to be some sort of satisfaction derived from it. Do you not?

Existence is pretty stable as far as life being life, but the events that occur within life are not. There is constant change in everything, but the mind is mostly blind to this because it wants stability (permanence). It defaults to making you believe the next fix will be it, but I guarantee you the next fix only leads to the one after that and so on. It never ends because there’s nothing permanent that allows it to end. Because everything is impermanent, the satisfaction associated with whatever’s reached for is also impermanent and this is the exact reason why one is constantly reaching and remains unsatisfied.

Comments on: "Impermanence of Everything " (3)

  1. sheila said:

    great ..and very well expressed …..certainly I want to keep this in mind ….
    .it’s what the Buddha taught …
    .except that meditation takes us …if done by watching thoughts arise and pass until one just sits in emptiness ….to a place where desire dissolves …..one doesn’t desire the meditation ..or the state …I have personally done this meditation in Burma and seen that it didn’t lead people to desire meditation for just getting peaceful states …called concentration meditation but when very high levels of wisdom are accessed ..I didn’t access this ..but I saw people who did ….and they didn’t do it through meditation on calm abiding or concentration meditation …..but through sitting for long periods without moving and watching the desire in their mind to move …..when strong bodily pain is there …initially the desire to move is strong but if one focuses on watching the desire itself, without following it, wisdom also arises and one sees that my leg, foot or whatever, along with the feeling of pain are just concepts, remains with a coolness in the heart, whatever is happening in the body …this then manifests in great peace whatever external conditions present themselves in life …..and not a desire to just sit in peaceful meditation states which I am told are highly addictive ……in fact I see those with very high levels in this don’t sit much in meditation …often but not always, they are involved in teaching it …..

    Liked by 1 person

  2. sheila said:

    I also read something that the Vipassana teacher S.N Goenka wrote in response to a question about whether the Buddha or an enlightened being still sat in meditation after his enlightenment …Goenkaji said Yes because it helped others …can’t now remember the reason how or why but it is in their Facebook group page …..

    Liked by 1 person

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